Eiablage beim Kaisermantel (Argynnis paphia)

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    Marc Fischers World of Silkmoths


    Silkmoths Logo


    Finding new offers of eggs and cocoons/dolls of tropical butterflies. In addition, high-quality breeding and flight cases are available.



    Cage
    • Eiablage beim Kaisermantel (Argynnis paphia)

      Zur Zeit fliegt der Kaisermantel in unserer Gegend erfreulich häufig. Da ich diese Art bisher noch nie gezüchtet hatte, startete ich nunmehr einen Versuch mit 2 Damen. Als Behältnis kam ein Gazekäfig zum Einsatz, der mit eingetopften Veilchen, Baumrinde und Buddleja als Saugmedium (in kleinen Vasen) bestückt war. Die Aufstellung des Käfigs erfolgte absonnig, um die Verhältnisse am Waldrand, wo die Art normalerweise die Eier ablegt, zu simulieren. Die Falter gewöhnten sich schnell ein und nahmen die Buddleja gerne an. Nach ca. 5 Tagen 'Gefangenschaft' setzte ich die Tiere wieder frei und untersuchte den Käfig auf erfolgte Eiablage. Dabei entsprachen die Befunde der Eierplatzierung den Angaben aus der Literatur: an den Veilchen nur 2 Eier, die Rinde war mit mehreren Eiern belegt, aber ein wesentlich größerer Teil befand sich im Spalt zwischen Zuchtkastendeckel und Kastenwand. Die Überraschung kam allerdings, als ich - eigentlich mehr zufällig - die Buddleja-Rispen untersuchte: Die Weibchen hatten überwiegend ihre Eier zwischen den Blüten versteckt! Ich meine, dies ist ist eine Beobachtung, die alle diejenigen, die ebenfalls einmal den Kaisermantel zur Eiablage bewegen wollen, beachten sollten. Es ist im Übrigen ein gewisses Geduldsspiel. die farblich zwar gut erkennbaren Eier (gelblichweiße Farbe) aus den Rispen zu zupfen - ich habe hierzu eine Lupenlampe mit 2facher Vergrößerung verwendet - aber hier ist Sorgfalt angebracht, um nicht allzu viele Eier ungewollt zu entsorgen.

      Schöne Grüße,
      Hans
      HM
      Your partner for good dried lepidoptera at fair prices" alt="LEPIDOPEXCHANGE
    • Lieber Andre,

      ich habe keine Fotos gemacht, da ich nicht wußte, ob die Eiablage überhaupt klappt. Ich glaube auch nicht, dass Fotos in diesem Falle besonders aussagekräftig wären. Falls jedoch noch 'technische' Fragen vorhanden sind - ich bin gerne bereit, diese im Detail zu beantworten.

      LG,
      Hans
      HM
    • Interesting. But not surprising. Argynnis paphia ( and same counts for aglaja, adippe, niobe ) need not violets for ovipositing. Best working setup for me is 3 - 5l white bucket with mesh gauze on all sides and also on top. About 2/3 of eggs are on top , rest on sides. Females likes going through mesh with tip of abdomen and put eggs on gauze "from other side". It is very good as eggs can be easy collected and in case of larvae hatched in autumn ( paphia, aglaja ) they are easy visible and can be easily collected for storage inside small doses for overwintering in winecooler or fridge. As for species overwintering in eggs ( adippe, niobe ) they can be stored and manipulated with easy in big quantity as I have them attached to gauze for whole winter. Eggs viability in spring is about 60-80%.

      Jan
    • Dear Jan,

      Many thanks for your additional info. Obviously, you have some experience with breeding those Nymphalids. Do you also have a 'guesstimate' on the percentage of A. paphia surviving hibernation? And when do you reactivate the caterpillars from the fridge in spring?

      Best regards,
      Hans
      HM
    • Argynnis paphia is tricky species for hiberbation. With natural overwintering I have various experiences, but my extremelly experienced friend from lowland was never able overwinter this species. Because last winters are very dry and warm in Slovakia I decided to move to artificial indoor hibernation. Last 2 years indoor survival was about 2/3 or more. A.paphia doesnt need frost and overwintering at temperatures a little bit over 0 C is OK.

      As for reactivation I am always looking to availablity of foodplant and specific target of breeding. All Argynnis I am rearing on Viola odorata, which has nice large leaves in spring. As I am rearing indoor in plastic food containers in large quantities, Violas must to be in advanced stage of development. A.paphia is less demanding species and they are OK without direct sun ( A.adippe is usually dying if direct sunshine for short time is not provided because they love basking even through windows, so it is not about UV rays, but about raising temperature for digestion ). Also rearing larvae together clearly leads to smaller average size of pupaes and imagos, especially females ( about 20-30% ) although enough food is present.
      If I want to return part of bred specimens to nature ( in case of rarer species ) I must synchronize my rearing with natural weather and expected occuring at locality. Larvae development to pupa for A.paphia indoor take about 3 weeks on spring in my conditions. Smaller Boloria species like dia or selene can be done for 12-14 days in case of 2nd generation. ( As for Boloria selene only if feeding is on Viola canina or especially Viola palustris. Viola odorata although eaten , is not ideal foodplant and development is significantly slower with loses )
    • Dear Jan,

      Thank you very much for your excellent advice on hibernating A. paphia caterpillars. Accordingly, I'll try the 'fridge method'. Indeed, I prefer this method for storing hibernating caterpillars or eggs, since I have a good control on the state of development etc.

      Best regards,
      Hans
      HM
    • Hello Jan,
      Can you describe how you hibernate them in the fridge? The winters in the Netherlands are most of the times very wet and I have never had very much survivors outside.
      So I 'd like to try overwintering them in the fridge. My eggs are already hatched.

      Best regards,
      Paul
    • Hello,

      just a 'follow-up' info on my own experience. The caterpillars hatched pretty soon after oviposition, with a high success rate. Since these rather small larvae do not feed before hibernation, I put them into small plastic boxes filled with chopped wood and placed these into the fridge. It was all but easy to find a balance between sufficient humidity and development of molds! Anyway, NONE of the larvae survived - it was my personal Waterloo...

      Sincerely,
      HM
    • Hi,

      Lepidopterix, I am sorry for your loss. I never lost 100% larvae in winecooler with Nymphalidae except A.laodice.

      I always split eggs /adippe, niobe/ or L1larvae /aglaja, paphia/ to 2 groups. For 2 different ways of hibernating.
      Some year work better one way, some another. Very important is also time until larvae goes to cold / november/ as during august-september small larvae are vulnerable to heat and dessication.

      1st method - fridge - Refrigerator--Speyeria unfed First Instars - Overwintering Techniques - Raising Butterflies--How to find and care for butterfly eggs and caterpillars

      2nd method - winecooler - stored in plastic box cca 15x30x5cm with nylon netting on top. On base there is about 10-15mm layer with boiled aquaristic gravel about 1-2mm. Larvae are on gauze where eggs were laid. I strictly avoid any natural biological material - wood, leaves - which can rot. I am regularly adding water to gravel layer / never over substrate !/ and spraying gauze. Water for adding or spraying MUST be same cold temperature !!!! If you use too warm water - 12C+ , larvae will wake up, will wander and can die due to energy loss if procedure is repeated. As there is fan inside winecooler, there is air movement also inside boxes and no significant mold is formed.

      Lepidopterix is true that humidity balance is crucial and not easy achieve, but I failed overwinter paphia in garden. In garden you are more depending on weather in exact year.

      Jan
    • Hi,
      Personally, I use this system for the wintering of argynninae, melitaeinae, satyrinae. A terracotta pot, two metal wires, a panty. The nourishing plant is transplanted in with a thin layer of sand on the surface. I find +/- 80 90% of young caterpillars in the spring. The pot is placed outdoors on a window shelf (south side).
      Greetings.
      Philippe
      Salut,
      Personnellement, j'utilise ce système pour l'hivernage d'argynninae, melitaeinae, satyrinae. Un pot en terre cuite, deux fils métalliques, un panty. La plante nourrissante est greffée avec une fine couche de sable à la surface. Je trouve +/- 80 90% des jeunes chenilles au printemps. Le pot est placé sur une étagère de fenêtre (côté sud).

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Philippe ().

    • Hi Philippe,

      Tried this way, sometimes works, sometimes not. It depends on species and weather and experience. Sometimes in spring whene temperature is about zero - soil remain frozen, but heavy rain made water standing on top of pot - very dangerous. Also Nederland has oceanic climate with mild tempratures and nice humidity during winter. I am from Slovakia, winters can have heavy frosts and also sunny dry weather - south orientation is not good, several times larvae dried. I have best experience with east orientation.
      Your method works perfectly for me for most of Satyriniae as long as grass is in form of tussock.
      But true is my friend was "your way" able to hibernate Argynnis laodice where I totally failed with artificial indoor hibernation.

      Jan
    • Hi Philippe,
      Your method could work fine for me. I also overwinter Ophrys-orchids this same way, and that works too ( as long as I am not on vacation when a very strong frost-spell comes along during my absence....)
      So I think I will try to hibernate them this way, just as the Satyriidae I have at this moment.

      Thanks.
      Paul
    • New

      Hallo Hans

      ein wenig spät aber besser als nie. Ich habe den Kaisermantel schon öfter versucht zur Eiablage zu bringen. Man kann dies, wie im chat beschrieben, in Gazekäfigen machen. Meine Erfahrungen vom Herbst 2017 waren jedoch absolut durchschlagend. Ich verwende Kartonröhren mit einem möglichst grossen Durchmesser. 15 cm sind optimal. Auf der einen Seite verschliesse ich die Röhre, zB mit dem richtigen Deckel (Posterversand) oder mit Gaze (Damenstrumpf und Gummiband) und auf der anderen Seite sicher mit einem Damenstrumpf und Gummiband. Nun gebe ich den Falter rein. Die Röhre kann nun aufrechtgestellt werden. Am oberen Ende (Damenstrumpf) kann man gut mit Honigwasser getränkte Watte drauflegen um den Falter zu füttern. So überleben die Weibchen sehr lange und fliegen sich dabei auch nicht kaputt. Um die Eiablage auszulösen kann man ein passendes Stück Rinde der Föhre reinstellen. Dies bewirkt Wunder. Das Weibchen wird ihre Eier alle in die Spalten der Rinde reinlegen, genauso wie sie es in Natur auch macht. Ich habe auf diese Weise innert 2 Tage weit über 100 Eier erhalten. Alle waren an der Rinde plaziert. Das Rindenstück kann man dann so wie es ist in einem geeigneten Gefäss überwintern und dann im Frühling am besten in einen Topf mit Veilchen stellen. Die Raupen werden dann schnell auf die Veilchen wechseln und zu fressen beginnen. Die Töpfe kann man gut in ein Aerarium stellen.
      Ich weiss ich bin zu spät aber vielleicht kannst Du das ja mal im nächsten Juli ausprobieren.
      Wie waren Deine Erfolge diesmal?
      Gruss
      Thomas
    • Users Online 1

      1 Guest